Bugatti - Veyron
The Bugatti Veyron 16.4 is a mid-engine sports car produced by Volkswagen AG subsidiary Bugatti Automobiles SAS. It is the quickest accelerating and decelerating car in the world, and it was the world's fastest car until it was beaten by the SSC Ultimate Aero TT. Powered by a 1,001 PS (987 hp/736 kW) W16 engine, it is able to achieve an average top speed of 408.47 km/h (253.81 mph). The car reached full production in September 2005, and is handcrafted in a factory Volkswagen built near the former Bugatti headquarters in Château St Jean in Molsheim (Alsace, France). It is named after French racing driver Pierre Veyron, who won the 24 hours of Le Mans in 1939 while racing for the original Bugatti firm.
GB (UK) England
GB (UK) England
Bugatti Veyron -click for a larger picture
Bugatti Veyron  
Bugatti Veyron 16.4
Location
Reading
County
Berkshire, England
click here to go to Holders Prestige Hire
Number of persons:2 Luggage:2 small Minimum driver age:30 Gearbox:manual 7 Speed Paddle ShiftPower steering: Leather interior: Air conditioning: Audio: radio cd
Development of this vehicle began with the 1999 EB 18.4 "Veyron" concept car. Introduced at the Tokyo Motor Show, it was similar in design and appearance to the final Veyron production car. One major difference was the EB 18.4's use of a W18 engine with three banks of six cylinders. The Veyron's head designer was Hartmut Warkuss with exterior designed by Jozef Kabaň of Volkswagen rather than Giorgetto Giugiaro of ItalDesign who had handled the three prior Bugatti concepts too. Volkswagen chairman Ferdinand Piëch announced the production Veyron at the 2000 Geneva Motor Show. It was promised to be the fastest, most powerful, and most expensive car in history. Instead of the W18, the production model would use a VR6/WR8-style W16 engine. First seen in the 1999 Bentley Hunaudieres concept car, the W16 would get four turbochargers, producing a quoted 1001 horsepower. Top speed was promised at 407 km/h (253 mph), and pricing was announced at €1 million.

 

Development continued throughout 2001 and the EB 16/4 Veyron was promoted to "advanced concept" status. In late 2001, Bugatti announced that the car, officially called the "Bugatti Veyron 16.4", would go into production in 2003. The car, however, experienced significant problems during development. Achieving the required high-speed stability was difficult - one prototype was destroyed in a crash and another spun out during a public demonstration at the Monterey Historics event in Mazda Raceway at Laguna Seca. Production of the Veyron was delayed pending resolution of these and other issues.  Piëch retired that year as chairman of the Volkswagen Group and was replaced by Bernd Pischetsrieder. The new chairman promptly sent the Veyron back to the drawing board for major revisions. Neumann was replaced as Bugatti president by Thomas Bscher in December 2003, and substantial modifications were made to the Veyron under the guidance of former VW engineer, Bugatti Engineering head Wolfgang Schreiber.  

 

Each Veyron is being sold for €1,100,000. Prices for the UK or the US are about over £800,000, or 1.2 million American dollars. The production costs of the car are approximately £4 million per vehicle. As Bugatti and, therefore, Volkswagen are taking such a loss, it has been compared by automotive journalist Jeremy Clarkson to the supersonic jetliner Concorde in that both were huge engineering achievements, but the car will probably, like the plane before it, be discontinued after proving to be an economic failure. It will be several years before Volkswagen will be able to see if their investment in developing ground-breaking technology has paid off. One key measure is how much (if any) of the technology developed for the Veyron finds use in mass-produced cars.  

 

Source: Wikipedia.
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