Ferrari - F40
The F40 was in the most literal sense designed as the successor to the company's GTO supercar, but the project's meaning ran deeper. At ninety years old, Enzo Ferrari was keenly aware that his life was coming to an end, and was somewhat disappointed that Ferrari's dominance in international motorsport had faded somewhat over the years. As a result, Enzo wanted a new pet project put into the pipelines, something that could remind the world of the company's capabilities as a manufacturer and come to be his masterpiece.

 

The company's impending 40th anniversary provided just the right occasion for the car to debut. The plan was simple: create a vehicle that combined the company's best technologies into a no-frills sports car that would come as close as possible to being a full fledged race vehicle while still retaining the necessary equipment to be a street-legal product. It was the last car to be commissioned by Enzo himself before his death.

AustriaGermany
Austria
Ferrari F40-click for a larger picture
Ferrari F40 1997
Ferrari F40
Location
Wien / Vienna
County
Austria
click here to go to Oldtimertreff
Number of persons:2 Luggage:2 small Minimum driver age:25 Gearbox:manual Power steering: Leather interior: Air conditioning: Audio: radio cd
Germany
Ferrari F40-click for a larger picture
Ferrari F40 1990
Ferrari F40
Location
Kirchen-Hausen
County
Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
click here to go to Special Cars
Number of persons:2 Luggage:2 small Minimum driver age:28 Gearbox:manual 5 Speed ManualPower steering: Leather interior: Air conditioning: Audio: radio cd
It was intended that there were to be 400 F40s made, all painted red. The F40 was designed with aerodynamics in mind, and is very much a creation of its time. For speed the car relied more on its power than its shape. Frontal area was reduced, and airflow greatly smoothed, but stability rather than terminal velocity was a primary concern. So too was cooling as the forced induction engine generated a great deal of heat. In consequence, the car was somewhat like an open-wheel racing car with a body. It had a partial undertray to smooth airflow beneath the radiator, front section, and the cabin, and a second one with diffusers behind the motor, but the engine bay was not sealed.

 

Nonetheless, the F40 had an impressively low Cd of 0.34 with lift controlled by its spoilers and wing. Power came from an enlarged, 2.9 L (2,936 cc) version of the GTO's twin IHI turbocharged V8 developing 478 PS (356 kW/471 hp) under 110 kPa (16 psi) of boost. The suspension setup, like the GTO's, remained a double wishbone setup, though many parts were upgraded and settings were changed. The unusually low ground clearance prompted Ferrari to include the ability to raise the vehicle's ground clearance when necessary.

 

The body was an entirely new design by Pininfarina featuring panels made of kevlar, carbon fiber, and aluminum for strength and low weight, and intense aerodynamic testing was employed. Weight was further minimized through the use of a plastic windshield and windows and no carpets, sound system or door handles were installed although the cars did have air conditioning. Early cars had fixed windows, although newer windows that could be rolled down were installed into later cars and the F40 did without a catalytic converter until 1990 when US regulations made them a requirement for emissions control reasons.   

 

The F40 was discontinued in 1992 and in 1995 was succeeded by the F50, which until a newer generation of factory backed GT1 cars that came along, remained competitive.  

 

Source: Wikipedia.
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