Lamborghini - Diablo
Lamborghini began developing the Diablo (which means "Devil" in Spanish) in 1985 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1990 at a base price of USD 240,000. Power came from a 5.7-litre, 48-valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing a maximum output of 492 hp (367 kW) and 427 ft·lbf (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 mph (325 km/h). The Diablo was originally rear-wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.
AustriaGermany
Austria
Lamborghini Diablo-click for a larger picture
Lamborghini Diablo 
Lamborghini Diablo
Location
Wien / Vienna
County
Austria
click here to go to Oldtimertreff
Number of persons:2 Luggage:2 small Minimum driver age:21 Not for driving - advertising and photography onlyGearbox:manual Power steering: Leather interior: Air conditioning: Audio: radio cd
Germany
Lamborghini Diablo-click for a larger picture
Lamborghini Diablo 1990s
Lamborghini Diablo
Location
Kirchen-Hausen
County
Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
click here to go to Special Cars
Number of persons:2 Luggage:2 small Minimum driver age:25 Gearbox:manual 5 SpeedPower steering: Leather interior: Air conditioning: Audio: radio cd
After three years of making minor adjustments to the Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.

 

Lamborghini had presented an open-topped concept version of the VT (Viscous Traction) at the 1992 Geneva Auto Show alongside the coupé when the car debuted there, but it was another 3 years before the model saw production. Other than its removable Targa-style carbon fiber roof panel, the vehicle was essentially identical to the coupé, with only a few minor styling differences, mainly in regards to the tail lights between the two models. The SV or "Sport Veloce" variant of the Diablo was an optional add-on package to the base car. It lacked the VT's all-wheel-drive system and electronic suspension, but it featured the VT's revised dashboard and larger brakes, a new 3-piece adjustable spoiler and was powered by a modified version of the 5.7-litre V12 producing 510 hp (380 kW). The car's air intakes were slightly differently shaped, and from 1999 onwards the vehicle had exposed headlamps as opposed to the pop-up units previous versions used.  

 

After Audi AG took over Lamborghini from its former South East Asian owners in 1998, Mycom and VPower, they set out to make major revisions to the Diablo so that it could continue to provide revenue while its replacement was developed. The VT 6.0 was their first (and last) truly intensive redesign of the car, meaning that it was more than just a cosmetic update to the existing model. Heavy styling changes both inside and out were made; the front bumper, air intakes and nose as well as the entire dashboard, seats and switchgear were changed and improved. Displacing 6.0 litres and based on the motor that powered the Diablo GT, which in itself was essentially a modified version of the 5.7, the motor had updated ECU software in addition to new intake and exhaust systems and a refined variable valve timing system with slightly less aggressive camshafts than had been used in the earlier versions.  

 

Source: Wikipedia.
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